Home News KIDS PRIORITISE THE GIFT OF GIVING DESPITE INCREASE IN MONEY WORRIES

KIDS PRIORITISE THE GIFT OF GIVING DESPITE INCREASE IN MONEY WORRIES

by jcp
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Children’s charitable donations increased 59% on pre-pandemic figures as the nation rallied together

Kids aged 6-18 donated £66,800 to NSPCC during COVID-19, with many making weekly contributions to the charity

This is despite 66% saying they are more worried about money since the start of the pandemic

New figures from financial education app, gohenry, reveal £200,000 has been donated to the NSPCC by its Gen-Z customers – doubling the amount raised pre-pandemic.

In the Youth Economy Report, gohenry also revealed that, despite 66%* of kids being more worried about money since the start of the pandemic, 6-18 year olds have donated more than ever before, with charitable donations during the first lockdown up 59% on pre-pandemic figures and over £66,800 donated to the NSPCC alone last year.

Mike McGrath, NSPCC Head of Partnerships, said: “I’d like to thank all of gohenry’s young customers who have chosen to donate to the NSPCC and help other children and young people. At the NSPCC and Childline we know how challenging the past year has been for many children due to a wide variety of reasons such as school closures, isolation from family and friends and fears about the virus. In light of everything young people have had to deal with, it’s inspiring to see that so many of gohenry’s customers decided to do their bit to support other children who might be struggling.”

In addition to the NSPCC, kids gave £82,200 to wider causes last year with their average charity donation increasing by 15% on the year before – up almost £1 from £6.35 per child in 2019 to £7.28 in 2020. The biggest increase in overall charity donations came from 16-year-old girls, with donations increasing by 375% during the first lockdown when charities were hardest hit.

Louise Hill, COO and co-founder of gohenry said: “The sharp increase in charitable giving suggests a heightened awareness of all the ways it’s possible to achieve gohenry’s mission of being good with money. After a challenging year, it’s heartening to see that the lasting legacy of COVID-19 could be an increased focus on social responsibility and social good, with children and teenagers leading the way.”

gohenry customer, Finlay aged 13, is inspired by the work that the NSPCC does with Childline and has made weekly donations throughout the pandemic.

He said: “I give 20p to the NSPCC each week using the gohenry giving feature. I looked up the charity and saw that it runs Childline, which I think is amazing, so I’m happy to support it. Children like me have had a stressful year, and some kids suffer with anxiety. Childline is an amazing way for them to talk about whatever is on their mind. It’s way more important to donate at the moment because people need extra help now that we’re in the middle of a serious pandemic.”

The NSPCC’s Mike McGrath added: “All the money raised by gohenry’s young members will ensure the NSPCC’s frontline staff can continue to deliver the charity’s vital services to those children and young people who feel they have nowhere to turn and need further support as we move out of the pandemic.”

For more insight into how Covid-19 changed Gen Z’s and Gen Alpha’s attitudes to money, view the full gohenry Youth Economy report here 

Methodology

gohenry insights are based on the behaviour of 398,140 UK child customers aged 6-18 who were ‘active’ across all of 2020 (child customers who activated their gohenry accounts before the start of 2020 and did not cancel at any point during the year).

*This survey was conducted by Censuswide, based on a sample of 2,009 children aged 6-18 in the UK (excluding Northern Ireland), with a minimum of: 33% aged 6-10, 33% aged 11-15 and 34% aged 16-18. The fieldwork took place between 08.10.20 – 16.10.20. Censuswide abide by and employ members of the Market Research Society which is based on the ESOMAR principles.

 

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